CNC Milling

CNC Milling Computer Numerical Control (CNC) Milling is the most common form of CNC. CNC mills can perform the functions of drilling and often turning. CNC Mills are classified according to the number of axes that they possess. Axes are labeled as x and y for horizontal movement, and z for vertical movement. A standard manual light-duty mill (such as a Bridgeportâ„¢) is typically assumed to have four axes: Table x, Table y, Table z, Milling Head z. The number of axes of a milling machine is a common subject of casual “shop talk” and is often interpreted in varying ways. We present here what we have seen typically presented by manufacturers. A five-axisCNC milling machine has an extra axis in the form of a horizontal pivot for the milling head. This allows extra flexibility for machining with the end mill at an angle with respect to the table. A six-axis CNC milling machine would have another horizontal pivot for the milling head, this time perpendicular to the fifth axis.

Machines
Qty
Agie Charmilles Mikron VCE800 PRO with CNC 4th Axis Rotary Table
1
Cincinnati Lamb CFV 850i with CNC 4th Axis Rotary Table
1
Cincinnati Lamb CFV 1300i with CNC 4th Axis Rotary Table, 5th Axis Rotary Table and System 3R tooling
1
Cincinnati Fixed Table Vertical 850 2500mm Worktable and CNC 4th Axis
1
Cincinnati Lamb 550 with Renishaw Tool & Part Probe
1
Cincinnati Milacron Sabre 1000 Vertical Machining Centre with 21 Tool Change & CNC Rotary Table (4th Axis)
1
Cincinnati Milacron Arrow 1000 Vertical Machining Centre with 21 Tool Change & CNC Rotary Table (4th Axis)
1
Cincinnati Milacron Sabre 750 Vertical Machining Centre with 21 Tool Change & Phoenix Pallet Master & CNC Rotary Table (4th Axis)
2
Bridgeport Series II Interact 4 – with Quick Change Tooling & CNC Rotary Table (4th Axis) Interface
2